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Camping - Knife

2 total items

Flitz Knife & Gun Care Kit [KG 41501]

SKU: 42818

Gun & Knife Care KitPart #: KG 4150Whether you are an avid sportsman or world-class collector, this kit is exactly what you need to clean, polish & protect your knives,...

Flitz Knife & Gun Care Kit [KG 41501]

SKU: 42818
in stock

Sale price $23.95

Save $2

Kuuma Filet Knife - 6" [51904]

SKU: 86556

Filet Knife - 6"The Kuuma Filet Knife features a 6", razor sharp stainless-steel blade that makes it easy to filet fish or cut other delicate meats.  The handle with rubber...

Kuuma Filet Knife - 6" [51904]

SKU: 86556
in stock

Sale price $11.99

Save $7

How to Choose Knives and Tools

To choose the right knives and tools, you need to consider their intended purpose, blade material, handle, brand reputation, and price. Determine the purpose of the knife or tool, as different types are designed for various uses. Consider the blade material, as this can impact durability, rust-resistance, and edge retention. Check the handle for grip and material, and look for a reputable brand to ensure a high-quality product. While price is an essential factor, investing in a high-quality knife or tool can be a worthwhile investment in the long run. By considering these factors, you can find the perfect knives and tools to meet your needs.

Types of Knives

Knives come in a wide range of styles and designs to suit different needs and preferences. Here are some additional types of knives:

Pocket knife:

A small folding knife that can fit in a pocket or be carried on a keychain. Pocket knives can have one or multiple blades.

Hunting knife

A fixed blade knife used for hunting, skinning, and field dressing game.

Tactical knife

A durable and versatile knife designed for military or law enforcement use, with features such as a serrated edge or a glass breaker.

Survival knife

A sturdy and reliable knife designed for outdoor survival scenarios, with features such as a sawback edge, a firestarter, and a compass.

Throwing knife

A knife designed specifically for throwing at a target, with a balanced weight and sharp point.

Dive knife

A corrosion-resistant knife designed for underwater use, with a serrated edge and a blunt tip for safety.

Machete

A large, heavy knife used for clearing brush, chopping wood, and other outdoor tasks.

Whittling knife

A small, sharp knife used for carving wood and creating detailed designs.

Electrician's knife

A specialized knife designed for cutting and stripping electrical wires, with a curved blade and insulated handle for safety.

Folding utility knife

A compact and versatile knife with a replaceable blade, used for cutting cardboard, carpet, and other materials.

Knife Blade Shapes

There are many different blade shapes used in knives, each with its own advantages and disadvantages depending on the intended use. Here are some of the most common blade shapes:

  1. Straight: A straight blade is the simplest and most common blade shape, with a straight edge that tapers to a point. It is good for slicing and chopping, and is easy to sharpen.

  2. Clip point:  A clip point blade has a concave curve on the back of the blade near the tip, which makes the tip more narrow and sharp. It is good for precision tasks and piercing.

  3. Drop point: A drop point blade has a convex curve on the back of the blade near the tip, which makes the tip more sturdy and strong. It is good for heavy-duty tasks and is often used in hunting knives.

  4. Tanto: A tanto blade has a straight edge and a thick point that angles sharply downward, creating a chisel-like shape. It is good for piercing and slicing, and is often used in tactical knives.

  5. Serrated: A serrated blade has a jagged edge that can easily cut through tough materials like rope and fabric. It is good for cutting through things that a straight edge would have trouble with.

  6. Gut hook: A gut hook blade has a hook-shaped opening near the tip that is used for cutting through animal skin during hunting or field dressing. It is good for precision cuts and helps prevent accidentally puncturing internal organs.

  7. Hawkbill: A hawkbill blade has a curve that hooks upward at the tip, like a bird's talon. It is good for cutting through tough materials like rope and leather, and is often used in rescue knives.

  8. Spear point: A spear point blade has a symmetrical shape with a point that is aligned with the center of the blade. It is good for piercing and is often used in throwing knives.

These are just a few examples of the many blade shapes available in knives. The shape of the blade can greatly affect the knife's functionality and versatility for different tasks.

Features of Knife

Here are some common features of knives:

  1. Blade: The blade is the main cutting edge of the knife. It can be made from various materials, such as stainless steel, carbon steel, or ceramic. The length, shape, and thickness of the blade can vary depending on the intended use of the knife.

  2. Handle: The handle is the part of the knife that is held by the user. It can be made from a variety of materials, such as wood, plastic, metal, or rubber. The handle should provide a comfortable and secure grip.

  3. Tang: The tang is the part of the blade that extends into the handle. A full tang knife has a blade that extends all the way through the handle, providing greater strength and stability.

  4. Edge: The edge is the sharpened part of the blade that is used for cutting. It can be either straight or serrated, depending on the intended use of the knife.

  5. Point: The point is the tip of the blade, which can be either sharp or rounded. A sharp point is good for piercing, while a rounded point is safer for general use.

  6. Spine: The spine is the non-sharpened edge of the blade that runs along the back of the blade. It can be used for tasks that require a blunt edge, such as pounding or scraping.

  7. Bolster: The bolster is the thick part of the knife where the blade meets the handle. It provides a counterbalance to the blade and can also protect the user's fingers from slipping onto the blade.

  8. Pommel: The pommel is the end of the handle opposite the blade. It can be used for tasks that require a blunt edge, such as hammering or crushing.

  9. Sheath: Some knives come with a sheath, which is a protective cover that the knife can be stored in. Sheaths can be made from various materials, such as leather or plastic.

These are just a few common features of knives. The specific features of a knife can vary depending on the type of knife and its intended use.

Knife Blade Materials

There are many different materials used to make knife blades, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Here are some of the most common materials:

Stainless steel:

Stainless steel is a common material used for knife blades. It is corrosion-resistant and easy to maintain, making it a good choice for everyday use.

High carbon steel:

High carbon steel is a harder, stronger material than stainless steel. It holds an edge well, but it is more prone to rust and requires more maintenance.

Damascus steel:

Damascus steel is a type of steel made by layering and forging different types of metals together. It creates a unique pattern on the blade and is known for its strength and durability.

Ceramic:

Ceramic blades are very hard and hold an edge well. They are also lightweight and easy to clean. However, they are brittle and can chip or break if dropped.

Titanium:

Titanium is a lightweight, strong material that is also corrosion-resistant. It is often used in high-end knives for its durability and aesthetic appeal.

VG-10:

VG-10 is a high-quality steel used in many Japanese-made knives. It is known for its hardness and ability to hold an edge well.

Cobalt:

Cobalt is a high-performance steel that is used in some high-end knives. It is known for its ability to hold an edge well and is often used in knives designed for heavy use.

These are just a few examples of the many materials used to make knife blades. The specific material used can greatly affect the performance and durability of the knife, so it is important to consider the intended use of the knife when choosing a blade material.

Knife Handle Materials

Knife handles can be made from a variety of materials, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Here are some common materials used for knife handles:

  1. Wood: Wood is a traditional material used for knife handles. It is durable, attractive, and provides a comfortable grip. However, it can warp or crack over time and requires some maintenance to keep it in good condition.

  2. Plastic: Plastic is a lightweight and durable material that is easy to clean. It is often used in inexpensive knives and is available in a wide range of colors and designs.

  3. Rubber: Rubber is a soft and grippy material that is often used in knives designed for outdoor activities or wet conditions. It provides a comfortable and secure grip, even when wet.

  4. Metal: Metal handles are strong and durable, but can be heavy and uncomfortable to hold for extended periods of time. They are often used in knives designed for heavy-duty tasks or tactical use.

  5. G-10: G-10 is a composite material made from layers of fiberglass and resin. It is strong, lightweight, and provides a good grip. It is often used in high-end knives.

  6. Carbon fiber: Carbon fiber is a lightweight and strong material that is often used in high-end knives. It is durable and provides a comfortable grip, but can be expensive.

  7. Micarta: Micarta is a composite material made from layers of linen or paper and resin. It is durable and provides a comfortable grip, even when wet. It is often used in high-end knives.

These are just a few examples of the many materials used to make knife handles. The specific material used can greatly affect the feel and performance of the knife, so it is important to consider the intended use of the knife when choosing a handle material.